Poetry of Love, Resistance, & Solidarity

for FayeBarbaraBooth

Is out there

In here I look at it

Through my west window

I see it each morning

My sweet little aide

Pulls the cord to my louvered blind

My room light flickers

“It’s going to rain,”

She tells me as she plugs in my hearing aid

Do I hear thunder

“Oatmeal for breakfast,” she goes on

She turns back my covers

Drops my feet to the floor

“Saturday”

She names one of the days

On my calendar the middle of the month

She won’t flip the page

That rumble might be thunder

Not TV in the room next door

I look at our town on the other side of

My west window

I wait

My nurse brings my meds

And my ride down the hall

For oatmeal

It’s Saturday

My friend–two doors down–

Lays her paper on my table

Refolded to the front page

Friday

She read it last night, looked at the funnies

Worked the cross-word

“Commissioners say they didn’t

Buy that building downtown

For a bigger museum

For our town”

Our town needs

More room for memories

Out there

We don’t keep them all

In here

Big news for

Our town

Out there

Old Museum’s too small

~ Barbara Booth

Barbara Booth, who has a degree in journalism from Kansas State University, writes “a smattering of stuff wherein the truth lies,” according to information posted on the Kansas Author’s Club website. She has published two books: A Centennial History of Clay Center and Diamond of the Flint Hills, a narrative history of her mother’s family. She also writes feature articles and poetry. Booth has been a member of the Kansas Authors Club since 1979. She served as District 4 president in 1986 and as state president in 1990-91.

March’s Guest Editor, Ronda Miller, is Poetry Contest Manager for Kansas Authors Club and their District 2 President. Her goal in both positions is to encourage people from all backgrounds and ages to appreciate and write poetry. As a Life Coach who specializes in working with those who have lost someone to homicide, she appreciates the multitude of voices and the healing power of the written and spoken word. Her quote, ‘Poetry is our most natural connection among one another’ best exemplifies her belief in poetry. Her words can be found in Begin Again 150 Kansas Poems, To the Stars Through Difficulties: A Kansas Renga in 150 Voices, Going Home: Poems from My Life and online in The Shine Journal – The Light Left Behind, Zingara Poet, Kansas Time + Space, and hard copy publications such as The Lawrence Journal World. She authored documentary The 150 Reride of The Pony Express and created poetic forms Loku and Ukol.

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Comments on: "Our Town by Barbara Booth" (2)

  1. writeejit said:

    Thanks, Barbara. This is a very stirring poem, full of strong images and ideas.

  2. I like the way you play on the word “memories.” The lines, “Our town needs/more room for memories,” is especially evocative.

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