Poetry of Love, Resistance, & Solidarity

Posts tagged ‘Pat Latta’

Painting God by Pat Latta

It was early in the morning
and maybe it was just a dream.Pat Latta
I visited with God just for a second.
That’s the way dreams go sometimes.
There’s something about God and time;
I guess you might say
they both go back a long, long way.

In my dream, I sat on the dewy grass
watching God begin to paint the morning.
I think a sunrise over the Flint Hills
is a good place to start, He said.
I’ll add a little wisp of fog in the valleys,
a glint of early light on the pond,
a reflection of the cottonwoods.
Sometimes I think I go too far
with sunlight on water.

Cottonwoods are beginning to turn,
so I need a little green,
a little yellow,
a little orange.
Oops. I might have overdone it.
I do that sometimes.

Let’s see, I’ll put a matching pair of herons
taking off with water dripping from their feet,
looking like they’re trailing fire in the sunlight.
I always like the way I do that.

I love to do clouds too,
I’ll add a couple to filter the sun
as it peeks over the horizon.
I’ll need lots of shades of blue for the sky now,
and different pinks and yellows for those clouds.
I always like to squeeze in just a little magenta
right down there on the horizon, too.

Sometimes I think I go too far,
He said.

God, I said, I couldn’t agree with you more.

 

Pat Latta grew up in a small town in central Texas. He moved to Wichita in 1983 and lives close to the Little Arkansas River. He writes with a weekly poetry group. He appreciates the power of individual words in poetry and strives to express ideas as concisely as possible.

Guest Editor: Roy Beckemeyer is from Wichita, Kansas. His poems have recently appeared in The Midwest Quarterly, Kansas City Voices, The North Dakota Review, and I-70 Review. Two of his poems were nominated for the 2016 Pushcart Prize competition. His debut collection of poems, “Music I Once Could Dance To,” published in 2014 by Coal City Review and Press, was selected as a 2015 Kansas Notable Book by the State Library of Kansas and the Kansas Center for the Book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Harvest of Hearts by Pat Latta

A freezing March wind ravaged the plainsPat Latta
Her daddy worried about
the calves
the wheat
the tractor

Her mama worried about her only daughter

A daughter who saw his eyes
in the blue March sky
His sunburned back
in the sunrise
His name in every book she read

She waited for June
and the harvest crew
when he and his cousin and brother
moved north from Texas

Maybe she could bring iced tea
to the crew
Maybe she would touch his hand
Oh Mama, please?

March is cold
on the Kansas plains
And lonely

~ Pat Latta

Pat Latta grew up in a small town in central Texas.  He moved to Wichita in 1983 and lives close to the Little Arkansas River.  He writes with a weekly poetry group.  He appreciates the power of individual words in poetry and strives to express ideas as concisely as possible.

Guest Editor Kelly W. Johnston is a life-long Kansan, who was born in Lawrence in 1955, and graduated from Wichita State in 1977 with a major in creative writing. He has published poems in Mikrokosmos, The Cottonwood Review, and The Ark River Review. He will publish two poems in the up-coming 2016 issue of The I-70 Review. Kelly loves to spend time on his land in the Chautauqua Hills near Cross Timbers State Park, where many of his poems are inspired.

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